Events

Foundations for a Thoughtful Judaism: Peoplehood

Foundations for a Thoughtful Judaism: Peoplehood

Taught by: Rabbi Holzman
Tuesdays, October 3, November 7, December 12, January 2, March 5, April 2
6:30-8:00pm, on Zoom

The Shalom Hartman Institute of North America has prepared a superb curriculum of
texts exploring the varied elements of a complex idea: Jewish peoplehood. What is this
idea? Are we an ethnic group, bound by some genetic common origin? Are we a
theological body, a group of believers connected through our spiritual convictions? Are
we geographically based? The answer is yes, and no, to all of the above. Please register
to receive the printed packet of texts from Hartman and join us on Zoom only for spirited
conversation and learning about what it means to be a part of the Jewish people.

Registration is required – click here to register!

Jewish Historians, History, and Historiography

Jewish Historians, History, and Historiography

Andrew Stein
October 8, 15, 22, November 5, 12 December 3, 10, January 7, 14, 21, February 4, 11, March 3, 10, 17, 24
9:30-10:45, on Zoom

This course will take a broad view of Jewish history, how it was envisioned over the
centuries, and how over about the last 250 years, modern Jewish historians have
trained, written, taught, and practiced their craft. We will focus primarily on the period
from about 1500 to 2000 CE and examine a range of themes and approaches in Jewish
history, the legacy of exemplary historians of the Jewish experience, and their changing
perspectives, methods, and topics. We’ll also consider the continuum ranging from
dispassionate, professional historians sorting out the actual record, versus history as
popular memory, a source of identity, and drawing lessons from the past for the present
and future of the Jewish people. Many among us also have probed Jewish history as
part of our own family history research, both in America and in our ancestors’ places of
origin. Finally, we will consider the role of archives and museums in conserving Jewish
history and shaping our understanding of it.

Registration is required – click here to register!

Jewish Historians, History, and Historiography

Jewish Historians, History, and Historiography

Andrew Stein
October 8, 15, 22, November 5, 12 December 3, 10, January 7, 14, 21, February 4, 11, March 3, 10, 17, 24
9:30-10:45, on Zoom

This course will take a broad view of Jewish history, how it was envisioned over the
centuries, and how over about the last 250 years, modern Jewish historians have
trained, written, taught, and practiced their craft. We will focus primarily on the period
from about 1500 to 2000 CE and examine a range of themes and approaches in Jewish
history, the legacy of exemplary historians of the Jewish experience, and their changing
perspectives, methods, and topics. We’ll also consider the continuum ranging from
dispassionate, professional historians sorting out the actual record, versus history as
popular memory, a source of identity, and drawing lessons from the past for the present
and future of the Jewish people. Many among us also have probed Jewish history as
part of our own family history research, both in America and in our ancestors’ places of
origin. Finally, we will consider the role of archives and museums in conserving Jewish
history and shaping our understanding of it.

Registration is required – click here to register!

Jewish Historians, History, and Historiography

Jewish Historians, History, and Historiography

Andrew Stein
October 8, 15, 22, November 5, 12 December 3, 10, January 7, 14, 21, February 4, 11, March 3, 10, 17, 24
9:30-10:45, on Zoom

This course will take a broad view of Jewish history, how it was envisioned over the
centuries, and how over about the last 250 years, modern Jewish historians have
trained, written, taught, and practiced their craft. We will focus primarily on the period
from about 1500 to 2000 CE and examine a range of themes and approaches in Jewish
history, the legacy of exemplary historians of the Jewish experience, and their changing
perspectives, methods, and topics. We’ll also consider the continuum ranging from
dispassionate, professional historians sorting out the actual record, versus history as
popular memory, a source of identity, and drawing lessons from the past for the present
and future of the Jewish people. Many among us also have probed Jewish history as
part of our own family history research, both in America and in our ancestors’ places of
origin. Finally, we will consider the role of archives and museums in conserving Jewish
history and shaping our understanding of it.

Registration is required – click here to register!

Jewish Historians, History, and Historiography

Jewish Historians, History, and Historiography

Andrew Stein
October 8, 15, 22, November 5, 12 December 3, 10, January 7, 14, 21, February 4, 11, March 3, 10, 17, 24
9:30-10:45, on Zoom

This course will take a broad view of Jewish history, how it was envisioned over the
centuries, and how over about the last 250 years, modern Jewish historians have
trained, written, taught, and practiced their craft. We will focus primarily on the period
from about 1500 to 2000 CE and examine a range of themes and approaches in Jewish
history, the legacy of exemplary historians of the Jewish experience, and their changing
perspectives, methods, and topics. We’ll also consider the continuum ranging from
dispassionate, professional historians sorting out the actual record, versus history as
popular memory, a source of identity, and drawing lessons from the past for the present
and future of the Jewish people. Many among us also have probed Jewish history as
part of our own family history research, both in America and in our ancestors’ places of
origin. Finally, we will consider the role of archives and museums in conserving Jewish
history and shaping our understanding of it.

Registration is required – click here to register!

Jewish Historians, History, and Historiography

Jewish Historians, History, and Historiography

Andrew Stein
October 8, 15, 22, November 5, 12 December 3, 10, January 7, 14, 21, February 4, 11, March 3, 10, 17, 24
9:30-10:45, on Zoom

This course will take a broad view of Jewish history, how it was envisioned over the
centuries, and how over about the last 250 years, modern Jewish historians have
trained, written, taught, and practiced their craft. We will focus primarily on the period
from about 1500 to 2000 CE and examine a range of themes and approaches in Jewish
history, the legacy of exemplary historians of the Jewish experience, and their changing
perspectives, methods, and topics. We’ll also consider the continuum ranging from
dispassionate, professional historians sorting out the actual record, versus history as
popular memory, a source of identity, and drawing lessons from the past for the present
and future of the Jewish people. Many among us also have probed Jewish history as
part of our own family history research, both in America and in our ancestors’ places of
origin. Finally, we will consider the role of archives and museums in conserving Jewish
history and shaping our understanding of it.

Registration is required – click here to register!

Jewish Prayer: Shabbat Liturgy

Clergy Class: Jewish Prayer: Shabbat Liturgy

Taught by: Rabbi Holzman, Cantor Caro, and Rabbi Barrett
Fridays, November 3, December 8, January 5, February 2, March 1, April 5

6:30-6:50pm, in person only

Prayer has sustained the Jewish People since its earliest days. It is in our DNA as Jews
to connect to each other, the sacred, and the world through worship services. Our liturgy
has nourished souls, comforted the lonely, and helped people become God’s people.
This class is open to anyone who is seeking to connect more deeply to prayer and
anyone who wants to wrestle with the meaning of prayer.

This class is team-taught by our clergy and will gather before Shabbat services on a
monthly basis to do a deep dive into a prayer or section of our liturgy.

Registration is required – click here to register!

Jewish Prayer: Shabbat Liturgy

Clergy Class: Jewish Prayer: Shabbat Liturgy

Taught by: Rabbi Holzman, Cantor Caro, and Rabbi Barrett
Fridays, November 3, December 8, January 5, February 2, March 1, April 5

6:30-6:50pm, in person only

Prayer has sustained the Jewish People since its earliest days. It is in our DNA as Jews
to connect to each other, the sacred, and the world through worship services. Our liturgy
has nourished souls, comforted the lonely, and helped people become God’s people.
This class is open to anyone who is seeking to connect more deeply to prayer and
anyone who wants to wrestle with the meaning of prayer.

This class is team-taught by our clergy and will gather before Shabbat services on a
monthly basis to do a deep dive into a prayer or section of our liturgy.

Registration is required – click here to register!

Jewish Prayer: Shabbat Liturgy

Clergy Class: Jewish Prayer: Shabbat Liturgy

Taught by: Rabbi Holzman, Cantor Caro, and Rabbi Barrett
Fridays, November 3, December 8, January 5, February 2, March 1, April 5

6:30-6:50pm, in person only

Prayer has sustained the Jewish People since its earliest days. It is in our DNA as Jews
to connect to each other, the sacred, and the world through worship services. Our liturgy
has nourished souls, comforted the lonely, and helped people become God’s people.
This class is open to anyone who is seeking to connect more deeply to prayer and
anyone who wants to wrestle with the meaning of prayer.

This class is team-taught by our clergy and will gather before Shabbat services on a
monthly basis to do a deep dive into a prayer or section of our liturgy.

Registration is required – click here to register!

Jewish Prayer: Shabbat Liturgy

Clergy Class: Jewish Prayer: Shabbat Liturgy

Taught by: Rabbi Holzman, Cantor Caro, and Rabbi Barrett
Fridays, November 3, December 8, January 5, February 2, March 1, April 5

6:30-6:50pm, in person only

Prayer has sustained the Jewish People since its earliest days. It is in our DNA as Jews
to connect to each other, the sacred, and the world through worship services. Our liturgy
has nourished souls, comforted the lonely, and helped people become God’s people.
This class is open to anyone who is seeking to connect more deeply to prayer and
anyone who wants to wrestle with the meaning of prayer.

This class is team-taught by our clergy and will gather before Shabbat services on a
monthly basis to do a deep dive into a prayer or section of our liturgy.

Registration is required – click here to register!