Events

Exploring Jewish Music

with Cantor Susan Caro
Tuesdays, November 17, December 15, January 19, February 16, March 16, April 20, May 25
7:30-9:00pm

Registration is highly encouraged. Click here to register.

11/17 – Jewish Music 101: What is Jewish Music, or, What Makes Music Jewish?
Let’s begin with ‘What is Jewish music? and how does Jewish music reflect and/or help me to better understand myself and my experience as a Jew living in the 21st century?

12/15 – The Art of Prayer: Western Art Music as Synagogue Sound
Since the Renaissance, Jews have risen to prominence in art music. This lesson explores the intersection of Western Art Music and Jewish music, and the influence it has had on the sound of synagogue worship.

1/19 – The Times They Are a Changin’, Part 1: Trends and Innovations in Jewish Music
In this session we will learn about innovations in Jewish music in America. Over this session and the next, we will look at music created in summer camps, youth groups, experimental congregations, concert venues and new forms of media, like YouTube, showing the dynamic and evolving developments of Jewish Music.

2/16 – The Times They Are A Changin’, Part 2: Innovators and Influencers
Continuing from the last session, we will explore three case studies whose music takes up the legacy of innovation, standing today at the forefront of an increasingly diverse Jewish American music scene.

3/16 – Jews, Jazz and Jewish Jazz, Part 1: Jews and Jazz
At the same time that Jews helped establish jazz as America’s art form, they also used it to shape the contours of American Jewish identity. Elements of jazz infiltrated some of America’s earliest secular Jewish music, formed the basis of numerous sacred works, and continue to influence the soundtrack of American Jewish life.

4/20 – Jews, Jazz and Jewish Jazz, Part 2: Jewish Jazz
We will look at how Jews’ relationship with jazz evolved from the 1960s through the present, specifically as it relates to Jewish identity.

5/25 – A Musical Light Unto The Nations: Ernest Bloch and Leonard Bernstein
In this session, we will delve into the issue of Jewish identity and the interface of our Jewish identity with the world around us by looking at two of the 20th century’s giants in the world of art music. We will explore the role their Jewish identities played in the creation of their music – as a window through which to look at our own Jewish identity.

Exploring Jewish History via Biography

with Andrew Stein
Sundays, October 18, 25; November 8, 15; December 6, 13; January 10, 17, 24, 31; February 7, 21, 28; March 7, 14, 21; April 11, 18, 25; May 2, 16, 23

In the Eleh Ezkerah on Yom Kippur, the prayer for martyrs, the machzor says, “we remember them as human beings defined by their moral choices, their sacrifices, their sense of responsibility.” And elsewhere in the liturgy, we have gratefully remembered “the Psalmists and Sages of Israel.” In this course, we will approach Jewish history from a different angle—via biographical profiles of about 20 key figures in the times of the Bible, antiquity, the middle ages, and then over the past roughly 250 years. We will look at the lives and legacies of religious leaders, statesmen and jurists, philosophers, poets, writers and linguists, journalists, scientists, military leaders, and philanthropists to tease out some broad themes in the study of Jewish history in the Land of Israel and the Diaspora, especially in Europe and the United States.

Click here to read a more in-depth description and click here to view the syllabus.

Registration is highly encouraged.

The Jewish Political Tradition

with Rabbi Michael Holzman
Fridays, October 23, November 20, December 18, January 15, March 19, April 16, May 21
8:15-9:30am

Every group, especially whole communities, need to have a way to organize and govern themselves. Throughout our history, both when Jews controlled territory in the land of Israel, and during the many centuries of diaspora community, Jews have developed ideas and philosophies about this topic and tested them in different circumstances. Given the ongoing debate about the health of American democracy, and our Rebuilding Democracy Project, now is a good time to look at what concepts Jewish thought has to offer about politics.

Registration is highly encouraged. Click here to register.

The Israel Study Group

with Rabbi Michael Holzman
Sundays November 15, December 13, January 10, February 21, March 14, April 11, May 16
11:00am-12:00pm

We will engage in study on a variety of topics, both historical and contemporary, about the Jewish state. No previous reading is required and newcomers are always welcome. The first session will be dedicated to the most recent peace agreements.

Registration is highly encouraged. Click here to register.

Exploring Jewish History via Biography

with Andrew Stein
Sundays, October 18, 25; November 8, 15; December 6, 13; January 10, 17, 24, 31; February 7, 21, 28; March 7, 14, 21; April 11, 18, 25; May 2, 16, 23

In the Eleh Ezkerah on Yom Kippur, the prayer for martyrs, the machzor says, “we remember them as human beings defined by their moral choices, their sacrifices, their sense of responsibility.” And elsewhere in the liturgy, we have gratefully remembered “the Psalmists and Sages of Israel.” In this course, we will approach Jewish history from a different angle—via biographical profiles of about 20 key figures in the times of the Bible, antiquity, the middle ages, and then over the past roughly 250 years. We will look at the lives and legacies of religious leaders, statesmen and jurists, philosophers, poets, writers and linguists, journalists, scientists, military leaders, and philanthropists to tease out some broad themes in the study of Jewish history in the Land of Israel and the Diaspora, especially in Europe and the United States.

Click here to read a more in-depth description and click here to view the syllabus.

Registration is highly encouraged.

Greatest Hits of Our Jewish Texts

with Rabbi Jessica Wainer
Wednesdays, November 11, December 9, January 13, February 10, March 17, April 14, May 12
12:00-1:00pm

If you have ever wanted to take a tour through Jewish text and didn’t know where to begin, this is the group for you! Take a break during the lunch hour and hop on for a brief text study with Rabbi Wainer. Together, we will explore some of the greatest hits of our Jewish texts, beginning with Tanakh and moving our way through Mishnah, Midrash, Talmud, and more modern texts! No previous experience or Hebrew skills required.

Registration is highly encouraged. Click here to register.

Jewish Ethics

with Rabbi Michael Holzman
Tuesdays, October 20; November 10, 24; December 8; January 12, 26; February 9, 23; March 9, 23; April 13, 27; May 11
7:30-9:00pm

Jewish text, tradition, and culture have a lot to say about how we conduct our lives, from our personal relationships to our business practices, to our obligations to the world at large. Rabbi Joseph Telushkin has been a collector of these ideas for over 40 years and his Code of Jewish Ethics is an accessible and instructive gateway to this body of Jewish thought. From the Torah to contemporary voices, Telushkin has organized a huge swath of our tradition into usable categories to help guide tough decisions and complicated situations. While the book can be studied alone, we will sample sections of Volume 1 of Telushkin’s (2 volume) book and discuss the various perspectives. Purchase of the book is not required but is recommended.

Registration is highly encouraged. Click here to register.

Jewish Short Stories

with Rabbi Jessica Wainer
Wednesday, November 4; Tuesdays December 1, January 5, February 2, March 2, April 6, May 4
7:30-9:00pm

Explore the world of Jewish short stories with Rabbi Wainer. Each month, we will read 1-2 short stories (stories will be provided ahead of time) and will explore both the author and the stories themselves. We will read some of the classics like Isaac Bashevis Singer and S.Y. Agnon and will also explore newer and lesser known Jewish authors. No book purchase is necessary, but each month we will share book recommendations with you!

Registration is highly encouraged. Click here to register.

Exploring Jewish History via Biography

with Andrew Stein
Sundays, October 18, 25; November 8, 15; December 6, 13; January 10, 17, 24, 31; February 7, 21, 28; March 7, 14, 21; April 11, 18, 25; May 2, 16, 23

In the Eleh Ezkerah on Yom Kippur, the prayer for martyrs, the machzor says, “we remember them as human beings defined by their moral choices, their sacrifices, their sense of responsibility.” And elsewhere in the liturgy, we have gratefully remembered “the Psalmists and Sages of Israel.” In this course, we will approach Jewish history from a different angle—via biographical profiles of about 20 key figures in the times of the Bible, antiquity, the middle ages, and then over the past roughly 250 years. We will look at the lives and legacies of religious leaders, statesmen and jurists, philosophers, poets, writers and linguists, journalists, scientists, military leaders, and philanthropists to tease out some broad themes in the study of Jewish history in the Land of Israel and the Diaspora, especially in Europe and the United States.

Click here to read a more in-depth description and click here to view the syllabus.

Registration is highly encouraged.

Jewish Ethics

with Rabbi Michael Holzman
Tuesdays, October 20; November 10, 24; December 8; January 12, 26; February 9, 23; March 9, 23; April 13, 27; May 11
7:30-9:00pm

Jewish text, tradition, and culture have a lot to say about how we conduct our lives, from our personal relationships to our business practices, to our obligations to the world at large. Rabbi Joseph Telushkin has been a collector of these ideas for over 40 years and his Code of Jewish Ethics is an accessible and instructive gateway to this body of Jewish thought. From the Torah to contemporary voices, Telushkin has organized a huge swath of our tradition into usable categories to help guide tough decisions and complicated situations. While the book can be studied alone, we will sample sections of Volume 1 of Telushkin’s (2 volume) book and discuss the various perspectives. Purchase of the book is not required but is recommended.

Registration is highly encouraged. Click here to register.